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Community Briefs

FCPL to host reception Sunday for ASI artists

The artists of Ability Services Inc. will be recognized at a reception this Sunday, Dec. 3, from 1–3 p.m. in the Anna & Harlan Hubbard Gallery at the Frankfort Community Public Library.

The gallery is filled with bright, beautiful artwork that was created using upcycled and donated materials. Ornaments, magnets, paintings, dream catchers and embroidery are all for sale. The exhibit will be on display through December 21. Everyone is welcome! Punch and cookies will be served.

Abilities Services is a community organization that provides services to clients with developmental disabilities and their families in Clinton, Montgomery, Tippecanoe and surrounding counties.

For further information, call 765-654-8746.

WFYI and Eiteljorg present ‘Native Art Now!’

“What I want people to take away from my work is a sense of humanity. I want people to recognize that Native people are human beings and our history is everybody’s history.” - Wendy Red Star (Crow, b. 1981)

Native Art Now!, a documentary airing Dec. 14 on WFYI 1, examines the evolution of contemporary Native art over the last 25 years, presenting personal perspectives from internationally acclaimed contemporary Native artists. Native Art Now! is a collaboration of WFYI Public Television and the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, home to one of the nation’s best collections of contemporary Native art.

What distinguishes contemporary Native art from traditional contemporary art? “About 15,000 years,” explains Jennifer Complo McNutt, curator of contemporary art at the Eiteljorg. “Contemporary Native artists have knowledge about their ancestors, traditions and lives that spans thousands of years. That changes the way you see the world.”

Since 1999, the Eiteljorg Museum’s nationally renowned biennial Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship has recognized leading Indigenous artists in the United States and Canada. This year’s retrospective exhibition, also called Native Art Now!, is on view at the Eiteljorg through Jan. 28, and the project also includes a major book, a recent symposium of artists and the feature documentary film.

IRS warns small businesses about identity theft

Individuals are not the only ones who should be on the lookout for cybercriminals looking to steal crucial financial information in order to commit fraud. Small business are equally at risk as thieves increase their knowledge of the tax code and industry filing practices to obtain valuable information.

Just like individuals, businesses may have their identities stolen and their sensitive information used to open credit card accounts or used to file fraudulent tax returns for bogus refunds.

In the past year, the Internal Revenue Service has noted a sharp increase in the number of fraudulent forms filed.

Identity thieves have long made use of stolen Employer Identification Numbers (EINs) to create fake W-2 Forms to file with fraudulent individual tax returns. Fraudsters also used EINs to open new lines of credit or obtain credit cards. Now, they are using company names and EINs to file fraudulent returns.

As with fraudulent individual returns, there are certain signs to indicate identity theft. Businesses, partnerships and estate and trust filers should be alert to potential identity theft and contact DOR if they experience any of these issues:

• Extension to file requests are rejected because a return with the Employer Identification Number or Social Security Number is already on file;

• An e-filed return is rejected because of a duplicate EIN/SSN is already on file with the IRS;

• An unexpected receipt of a tax transcript or IRS notice that doesn’t correspond to anything submitted by the filer;

• Failure to receive expected and routine correspondence from the IRS because the thief has changed the address.

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) offers a reference guide providing the fundamentals of a small business information security program in non-technical language. For more information, visit www.nist.gov.